A Caboodle of Pragilematic Posts

I’ve been hanging out and posting at the ASPE SDLC blog.  Yes…I have their permission to do that.  Geesh.  Check em out Gilbert:

Six Things To Avoid When Reporting Project Status – Project status is about the facts and your strategy to address and manage those facts.

This Daily Standup Is a Joke – This article details some challenges associated with daily stand-ups and some potential strategies for dealing with these.

An Axiom of Project Success –  What’s the common thread to project success?  We’ve seen projects that should have died.  We’ve also seen projects fall apart that seemed like they were in the bag.  This post attempts to nail the overriding factor.

That’s Great…But How Does Agile Benefit Our Shareholders?  – Selling agile to key leaders in your organization takes more than just a thorough understanding of story points, and time-boxing.  This post brings it home for those wanting  a bigger bang for their agile swang.  Whatever that means.

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Old Houses

Legacy software, in some ways, is like an old house. There are features that one might consider defects, errors or poorly implemented designs. A badly hung door. A sink in the wrong spot. Not enough outlets in a room. But the inhabitants adapt, cope and even harness utility out of the malfunction.

They implement patches, fixes, and add-ons to address the *issues*. But they never truly fix all of it. Instead they run more extension cords, tighten the hinges every month, or modify their behavior for washing, cooking or cleaning. They work with the old house, and the legacy software….accepting it as incomplete and adequate enough. A sort of perfection in imperfection.

Just as with software, houses have features that are too costly to fix, too embedded within the culture to remove, and too risky to replace. Is this acceptance of mediocrity or recognition of reality?

The plateau of legacy software is marked by this adaptation and acceptance of what is. There is no more striving for a better, greater product; there is just a kinship with the present. The power user rules this lifecycle. He or she knows the tricks, short cuts, bugs-but-also-features, and data rules of the product. They become one with the development team and a common bond forms.

Old software is the stock of the enterprise IT shop. Reliable, if only because we know how it doesn’t work. Dependable, if only because we know how and when it will fail. Usable, if only because we’ve learned to accept its flaws.